Day Of Reckoning

If someone decided they hated your family, and then rounded them up, at gunpoint, before torturing and finally killing them, would you ever cease trying to bring that person to justice?

I’m guessing most sane people would answer ‘no’. Let’s face it: most of us, if G-d forbid faced with such a loss, would have to be physically restrained from¬† hunting down the perpetrator and throttling them with our bare hands.

We would want, indeed we would yearn for, a day of reckoning.

Yet surprisingly, many of those who agree with the above sentiments when applied to their own loved ones, expect the suspected Nazi murderer, John Demjanjuk, to be let off.

On this very blog, someone has stated that to extradite him is ‘cruel’, given his ‘frail condition’. And let’s be clear on this: it is not, as that same person has said, , ‘you jews‘ that are responsible for this latest development. It is GERMANY that is extraditing Demjanjuk,¬† because prosecutors there believe they have overwhelming evidence that this man killed 29,000 innocent people.

Since when does a murderer – whether of one or one million people – get to escape justice purely on the basis that he – unlike his victims – was fortunate enough to reach old age? What an astonishing argument for anyone to use – yet use it they do.

Would those same people ever seek to generalise this ‘reasoning’? Is that how they would ever envisage a nation’s justice system operating? Presumably not.

Yet, again, when it’s Jews that have been the murdered souls, and when it’s a suspected Nazi who is facing his day of reckoning, somehow it’s deemed more moral to condemn the relatives of the victims for desiring justice, as opposed to agreeing that the murderer must be held to account.

I have no respect for those who argue that this man should be left alone to die of old age. He showed no mercy, no justice, no humanity to those 29,000 innocents. I see no reason why he should be entitled now to what he denied them.